Friday, 27 September 2019

Artificial Ovary through 3D Printed

Artificial Ovary through 3D Printed

Artificial Ovary through 3D Printed

A 3-D printed ovary allowed an infertile mouse to naturally mate and give birth to pups of their own, according to new research conducted by Camille Shah, an assistant professor at McCormick School of Engineering and Teresa K. Woodruff, a scientist at Northwestern University in the US. Ovaries are an essential part of the female reproductive system. These glandular organs, when healthy, produce hormones and release at least one egg each month for a mature follicle for possible fertilization. An artificial ovary needs to facilitate ovulation in order to be functional. Faced with this task, Shah and her colleagues created by a 3-D printed structure made out of hydrogels a material that is 99% water with the little polymer in it to give strength. Gelatin is a hydrogel made for collagen, which is found in human bones and skin and is safe to use inside the body. The scaffolding material was also endowed with pores in which follicles could be placed.

Artificial Ovary through 3D Printed


Space was provided for follicles to grow and blood vessels to infiltrate the ovary without damaging it. Once seeded with follicles, the structure was transplanted into the mice whose ovaries had been removed. The ovaries became fully functional as a soft-organ transplant. The follicles matured and the mice ovulated. After mating, their eggs were fertilized and they gave birth to at least two pups each. The mice with the prosthetic ovaries were even able to produce milk in a normal way. The pups developed normally and were further able to reproduce. This breakthrough discovery may lead to a new era of regenerative medicine. Artificial ovaries could help restore fertility to the young cancer survivors who underwent life-preserving treatments that rendered them sterile. The prosthetic ovaries in mice have shown to have a long term, durable function but further work is crucial to determine whether the synthetic ovaries would function in a similar manner in humans without risk of cancerous cells. Professor Woodruff suggested that it could also help in designing a range of artificial organs. It could be used instead of transplants from dead people that require the patient to take immune-suppressing drugs for the rest of their lives.

THE BIZARRE SPIDER-GRYFFINDOR’S HAT COMES ALIVE

BIZARRE SPIDER


A team of arachnologists from Mumbai discovered a species of spider in the Central Western Ghats of Karnataka. The spider resembles the magical hat worn by the character Gryffindor in Harry Potter series. The researchers, also fans of this series based on the book by the author, J.K. Rowling, paid a tribute by naming the spider after that the magical character. The scientific name of this spider is Eriovixia Gryffindor. This spider is hardly 7mm in length has an oddly-shaped brown patterned body that arises from a wide base with a tapered, bent peak above the spider’s back.

The spider takes the shape of a magical hat and camouflages itself by resembling a dried leaf during daytime for protection from predators. The Eriovixia genus contains 20 species of orb-weaving spider and widely distributed across Asia and Africa. They are known for having a hairy carapace and a tapering abdomen that is sometimes tipped with a tail-like appendage. Though it resembled other types of Eriovixia spiders, parts exoskeleton and the shape of its genitalia told the scientists that it is different enough to be considered as a new species. In the study, the scientists described their whimsical name choice as “an effort in to draw attention to the fascinating, but often overlooked the world of invertebrates and their secret lives,” proclaiming E. Gryffindor to be an ode from the authors, for magic lost and found.

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